The Yup'ik Eskimo shaman's role is to be a conduit between human, animal and Spirit realms. Before a hunt, Peter Williams smudges with Labrador Tea, praying for safety and clean kills. He asks the animals for their lives before he shoots, and gives them their last drink of water before he skins. Their meat is a large part of his diet, a gift he shares with community. These acts honor the animals so their Spirits will visit again. Under the label Shaman Furs, he carries on the ancient art of elegant, simple construction built to endure, viewing that fashion tells a complex story in the simplest way. Peter sews seal and sea otter fur by hand, each stitch binding the human world closer with that of animals. His work was profiled by the Guardian in the article “Why Would Anyone Want To Shoot A Sea Otter?”. He had a fashion presentation at TechStyle Lounge part of New York Fashion Week 2015. At Southeast Alaska Indian Cultural Center, Sheldon Jackson Museum and Alaska State Museum, he demonstrated skin sewing. He taught classes to Alaska Native youth. Recently completed a Rasmuson Foundation Artist Residency at Santa Fe Art Institute. Williams has guest lectured at Yale University, Portland Art Museum and 516 ARTS. Born, raised, and based in Alaska, his goals are to express and celebrate the oneness of all things, with emphasis on the human Spiritual relationship with nature. This connection is healing for the human soul and is necessary for the well-being of the planet.  

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